How I Use Google Keep As My Main Inbox

After the announcement of the upcoming Wunderlist demise, I started using Todoist for my daily tasks, I also moved there all my other random lists, but not having due dates, those tasks were a bit hidden to me, especially on the mobile app. Todoist is great if you basically only check the Today or Next 7 Days sections while on the go, but the rest of your projects aren’t immediately reachable, it requires too many steps for me to get there and this way I tend to forget about them. I know the desktop app is better and I use it to plan my week, but I mostly check Todoist on my phone.

That’s why I decided to use Google Keep as my main Inbox and Capture tool. The main reason why I love the app, in addition to the smartphone widgets and the Chrome clipping extension, is that, when you open it, everything is in front of you. Sure, you can archive notes (and I usually do that adding tags for things I want to reference in the future), but everything you add stays in this general space which is like an infinite inbox or, how I like to see it, a digital whiteboard full of post-its. You can drag and drop the notes, search them, and order them the way you prefer, but you can also pin them to the top or add tags to keep things organized. No notebooks, text formatting or similar though, Keep is super simple.

I started using it more and more after purging my accounts, because I wanted to simplify my life and it was nice having all in one place. I tried to use Evernote as my main capture tool for some time, because I wanted to take vantage of my Premium subscription, but, since I already used it as an archive for my articles and university class notes, I noticed the app was always working in the background using too much battery life and power of my smartphone. Google Keep, instead, is a super light app and works amazingly well on my Android devices.

Being able to add checkboxes and change the color of my notes makes Keep the perfect place for lists (grocery lists, book lists, movie lists, wishlists, you name it), for example, I share a note with my mom that contains the links to the websites of the cinemas we like, so we can easily check their timetables each week.

Other things inside my Google Keep:

  • ideas and random notes
  • books I want to check out at the library
  • articles I want to read later
  • websites to check out from my laptop
  • Instagram hashtags
  • photos of the products I have to buy (like medical stuff that are usually difficult to remember)
  • ebooks on my Kindle that I still have to use
  • drafts of articles
  • quotes

I usually process Keep once a day from my laptop and move tasks to Todoist, ideas to Trello and visit websites. But I don’t practice “Inbox zero” there, I still keep my lists for future reference, because, again, I don’t like the way they are displayed on Todoist. You can also add time/location based reminders (that are also connected to Google Calendar), but I don’t usually use this feature very often to be honest.

I couldn’t recommend this app enough, it’s free and connected to your Google account (so you don’t have to remember another password), it’s easy to use even for non techy people, it has a nice layout and it’s even connected to Google Docs.

If you like Google Keep, but aren’t still sure how to use it, I highly recommend this video, it gave me tons of inspiration.


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